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What annoys Eddie the most…editing without permission

Just to give you a bit of background myself. I took up photography in 2012 and have been steadily improving over the years picking up tips and tricks along the way and also passing on what I know to others.

Lack of Watermark

During this time, things that didn’t matter or bother me much now do. An example, at the start I didn’t add a watermark on each photo until I found it on a site that didn’t credit me but there was no way to really prove it was my work (see photo below taken in 2012). So from that day, I started adding my watermark. Velma Cosplay by Gina B Cosplay.

Velma by Gina B Cosplay

Road to Learning

But over the last few months, what really has bothered me which caused that massive rant post you can see at the top of this post, is the number of people who edit my photos. Let me say this now, I DO NOT ALLOW ANYONE TO EDIT MY PHOTOS WITHOUT MY PERMISSION. There are only a few occasions where I have given permission.  As I mentioned I am still learning my trade and need to know what I need to look out for to edit or improve a photo. I personally like to keep to the original look as possible but I do understand a bit of skin smoothing, taking out the bumps and slight tuck here gives the cosplayer/model a confidence boost. But I would like to be told of this so I can improve my skill or learn a new skill. I don’t like when I discover that the cosplayer has taken it upon themselves to edit the photo without telling me, even though I have said to them “Please let me know first if you want to edit the photo”.

I am not saying I’m great at editing everything correctly and I will admit I do miss things every so often, and this is why I appreciate people letting me know of areas they like editing, so I know for future reference.

For what I do, basic editing as I call it, I spend between 10-30 mins just colour correcting, cropping, and adding radical/gradient filters to the photos. For everything else, I have to put it through Photoshop. I know 10 minutes isn’t a long time but at a comic con weekend, I have to filter through over 2000 photos and then process each photo individually, which takes me a few days to get through them.

One of my edits

As you can see below, with a recent photoshoot with Squeakehb as Livewire, the image on the left is the finished photo and on the right is the original. This is the level of editing I am comfortable with, before going into major composite editing. It was great to see people like Sqeukahb sharing this photo as I presented it to her.

Instagram filters and anything similar

Instagram filter……again, I do not like it. It’s the same principle as changing the photographer’s original version of the photo. I really don’t think it’s that hard to ask the photographer if it’s okay to edit or add a filter on top before it goes out. But saying that, I think most photographers will like to have their work as it was presented to the cosplayer.

I hope this gives a bit of an insight into why I and other photographers get annoyed when their work gets edited without permission.

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The world of cosplay is a lot of fun where you get to play out your favourite character and be surrounded with like-minded people within the same franchise/fandom. But whether you’re a seasoned pro or just starting out, feeling confident and prepared in front of the camera is part of that cosplay experience, and I thought I would share some tips and view-points from what I have learnt over time as a Cosplay Photographer: Before the Shoot: Preparation is Key: Research the photographer’s style and the type of shoot, knowing their skills and limitations. Knowing what’s expected will help you come prepared. Booking your Photographer: Where possible, see if that photographer has a booking schedule system or if you’ll have to grab them when they are free. Having a clear time and date will help you find each other and be prepared to work with the photographer to maximise the time with each other. Know your Poses: Make sure you know the key poses that the character you are cosplaying does. Not only will this help when shooting with your photographer who you have scheduled with but also anyone you bump into who wants to get a photo with you. If you can’t think of poses, use google image search to create a “mood board” of your character which you can pick out at a moment’s notice. Shooting at a Comic-Con: Embrace Positivity: Project confidence and enthusiasm! A positive attitude translates into captivating photos. Listen and Adapt: The photographer will guide you through poses, but don’t be afraid to suggest your own ideas and find what works best for your body or even ask for directions from your photographer. Move with Intention: Avoid stiff or awkward poses. Make small, natural adjustments to keep your body dynamic and fluid. Embrace Angles: Don’t stand flat-on straight all the time. Experiment with angling your body, head, and shoulders to create more dynamic compositions. Avoid awkward arm placement. Try gentle bends and creating space between your limbs and torso to flatter your figure. Eye Contact: Powerful eye contact can make a photo truly captivating. Look directly at the camera or follow the photographer’s instructions for where to focus your gaze. Location, Location, Location: Make sure you and the photographer are happy with the area you are shooting your cosplayer against. Don’t be afraid to inform the photographer that the background doesn’t suit the character and suggest an alternative location which better suits the character. Review and Reflect: Don’t be afraid to ask to see the back of the camera shot, this might help with posing for the next shot, spotting any out-of-place item, clothing or areas of your cosplay which can be easily rectified. How not to be black-listed: No-Show: Understand that unexpected delays can happen. If you’re running behind schedule, communicate with the photographer as soon as possible. They may be able to adjust the shoot time within their availability. However, keep in mind that consistently being late or, even worse, no-showing, can damage your reputation as a reliable cosplayer. Photographers value their time, and being late disrupts their schedule and potentially prevents them from taking on other bookings. Respect Time Limits: Be on time for the shoot, and aim to be ready to go when it’s your turn. Being late or taking excessive breaks can throw off the entire schedule and frustrate everyone involved. Listen and Learn: Be receptive to the photographer’s vision. While you can suggest ideas, avoid being argumentative or constantly questioning their expertise. No, adding Filters or Editing Photos: While it’s natural to want photos to perfectly reflect your vision, editing them yourself after receiving them from the photographer can cause frustration. 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For more cosplay photos, visit our TwitterInstagram, Threads and Facebook page

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The world of cosplay is a lot of fun where you get to play out your favourite character and be surrounded with like-minded people within the same franchise/fandom. But whether you’re a seasoned pro or just starting out, feeling confident and prepared in front of the camera is part of that cosplay experience, and I thought I would share some tips and view-points from what I have learnt over time as a Cosplay Photographer: Before the Shoot: Preparation is Key: Research the photographer’s style and the type of shoot, knowing their skills and limitations. Knowing what’s expected will help you come prepared. Booking your Photographer: Where possible, see if that photographer has a booking schedule system or if you’ll have to grab them when they are free. Having a clear time and date will help you find each other and be prepared to work with the photographer to maximise the time with each other. Know your Poses: Make sure you know the key poses that the character you are cosplaying does. Not only will this help when shooting with your photographer who you have scheduled with but also anyone you bump into who wants to get a photo with you. If you can’t think of poses, use google image search to create a “mood board” of your character which you can pick out at a moment’s notice. Shooting at a Comic-Con: Embrace Positivity: Project confidence and enthusiasm! A positive attitude translates into captivating photos. Listen and Adapt: The photographer will guide you through poses, but don’t be afraid to suggest your own ideas and find what works best for your body or even ask for directions from your photographer. Move with Intention: Avoid stiff or awkward poses. Make small, natural adjustments to keep your body dynamic and fluid. Embrace Angles: Don’t stand flat-on straight all the time. Experiment with angling your body, head, and shoulders to create more dynamic compositions. Avoid awkward arm placement. Try gentle bends and creating space between your limbs and torso to flatter your figure. Eye Contact: Powerful eye contact can make a photo truly captivating. Look directly at the camera or follow the photographer’s instructions for where to focus your gaze. Location, Location, Location: Make sure you and the photographer are happy with the area you are shooting your cosplayer against. Don’t be afraid to inform the photographer that the background doesn’t suit the character and suggest an alternative location which better suits the character. Review and Reflect: Don’t be afraid to ask to see the back of the camera shot, this might help with posing for the next shot, spotting any out-of-place item, clothing or areas of your cosplay which can be easily rectified. How not to be black-listed: No-Show: Understand that unexpected delays can happen. If you’re running behind schedule, communicate with the photographer as soon as possible. They may be able to adjust the shoot time within their availability. However, keep in mind that consistently being late or, even worse, no-showing, can damage your reputation as a reliable cosplayer. Photographers value their time, and being late disrupts their schedule and potentially prevents them from taking on other bookings. Respect Time Limits: Be on time for the shoot, and aim to be ready to go when it’s your turn. Being late or taking excessive breaks can throw off the entire schedule and frustrate everyone involved. Listen and Learn: Be receptive to the photographer’s vision. While you can suggest ideas, avoid being argumentative or constantly questioning their expertise. No, adding Filters or Editing Photos: While it’s natural to want photos to perfectly reflect your vision, editing them yourself after receiving them from the photographer can cause frustration. This is because the photographer has put significant time and effort into editing the photos according to their artistic style and your initial consultation. However, open communication is key! If you have specific changes in mind, talk to the photographer. They may be able to make adjustments for you, or they might suggest edits you can do yourself within their overall vision for the photos. Remember: Relax and Have Fun!: Cosplay Photography is a creative collaboration. Enjoy the process, experiment, and don’t be afraid to let your personality shine through. Take Breaks: Stay hydrated and take short breaks to avoid fatigue, especially between shoots and during high heat. This will help you maintain your energy and focus throughout the shoot. The Patience Game: After the comic-con has finished, it is very easy to want to see the photos you’ve taken with the photographer but please bear in mind that many cosplay photographers are doing this as a hobby and have a day job. Different photographers will have different timelines and the amount of editing they’ll perform on each photo, depending on how many photos were taken and how much of a backlog of photos they already have. Please give photographers an appropriate amount of time before contacting them, about 2/3 months and be polite about the whereabouts of your photos. By following these tips and fostering a collaborative spirit, you can ensure a successful and enjoyable photoshoot experience. With practice and a positive attitude, you’ll be striking stunning poses and captivating audiences in no time! For more cosplay photos, visit our Twitter, Instagram, Threads and Facebook page Twitter Instagram Facebook WordPress Like this:Like Loading... [...] Read more...
Cosplay by turtlely.lev Taken at MCM Comic Con London 23 For more cosplay photos, visit our Twitter, Instagram, Threads and Facebook page Twitter Instagram Facebook WordPress Like this:Like Loading... [...] Read more...
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This week’s Cosplays We Like comes from Cammy from the Street Fighter franchise. Cammy White, also known by the codename Killer Bee, is a fictional character in the Street Fighter fighting game series created by Capcom. She debuted in 1993 as one of the four new characters in Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers. Cammy has become a popular fighter among players, known for her English brawler style, special gauntlets, and combat boots tailor-made for kicking. Cammy was initially a Shadaloo assassin but later became an MI6 Delta Red operative. She possesses skills in knife-throwing and horseback riding. Her moveset includes iconic moves like Spiral Arrow, Cannon Spike, and Cannon Strike. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Mikasa Rino ♡ (@mikasarino) View this post on Instagram A post shared by Chiquitita Cosplay (@chiquititacosplay) View this post on Instagram A post shared by BeautifulDiz (@beautifuldiz1) View this post on Instagram A post shared by Alina Becker (@japp_leack) View this post on Instagram A post shared by Sophie S (@peachmilky_) Disclaimer: All images and videos used, do not belong to FnC and belong to their respective owners. For more cosplay photos, visit our Twitter, Instagram, Threads and Facebook page Twitter Instagram Facebook WordPress Like this:Like Loading... [...] Read more...
Cosplay by drawiingdreamer Taken at MCM Comic Con London 23 Please Note : Generative AI Fill was used to edit these photos, only on the background to remove people/objects and not on the cosplayer. For more cosplay photos, visit our Twitter, Instagram, Threads and Facebook page Twitter Instagram Facebook WordPress Like this:Like Loading... [...] Read more...
This week’s Cosplays We Like comes from the DC character Black Canary. Black Canary is the name of two superheroines appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. Dinah “Diana” Drake I (Golden Age Black Canary), created by the writer-artist team of Robert Kanigher and Carmine Infantino, the original Black Canary debuted in Flash Comics #86 in 1947 during the Golden Age of Comic Books. Dinah Drake is a skilled hand-to-hand combatant without superhuman abilities. She is sometimes referred to as the Golden Age Black Canary. Dinah Laurel Lance (Black Canary II), Created by Dennis O’Neil and Dick Dillin, the second Black Canary first appeared in Justice League of America #219 in 1983. Dinah Laurel Lance inherited the Black Canary mantle from her mother, Dinah Drake. She possesses the Canary Cry, which allows her to create ultrasonic vibrations whenever she screams. Dinah Laurel Lance is a metahuman and a gifted martial artist. She has been a member of various superhero teams, including the Justice League, Justice League International, and the Birds of Prey. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Sarah Dean (@seattlesbeauty) View this post on Instagram A post shared by Roxanne🖤 (@platinumroxxy) View this post on Instagram A post shared by Irina Meier (@irine_meier) View this post on Instagram A post shared by Krissi (@krissi.q) View this post on Instagram A post shared by Ashlynne Dae (@ashlynnedae) Disclaimer: All images and videos used, do not belong to FnC and belong to their respective owners. For more cosplay photos, visit our Twitter, Instagram, Threads and Facebook page Twitter Instagram Facebook WordPress Like this:Like Loading... [...] Read more...
Cosplay by Nomiteee Taken at MCM Comic Con London 23 For more cosplay photos, visit our Twitter, Instagram, Threads and Facebook page Twitter Instagram Facebook WordPress Like this:Like Loading... [...] Read more...
Cosplay by Joywhale Cosplay Taken at Viencon 23 For more cosplay photos, visit our Twitter, Instagram, Threads and Facebook page Twitter Instagram Facebook WordPress Like this:Like Loading... [...] Read more...

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